Cardiac Rehabilitation and Return to Unsupervised Exercise

Cardiac Rehabilitation is a medically based, professionally supervised program that assists people in recovering from heart attacks, heart surgeries, and other coronary interventions such as PTCA (angioplasty) and stenting. Cardiac rehab intervention, most often prescribed by doctor referral, has been shown to reduce rates of re-hospitalization, lower mortality rate, decrease the need for cardiac medications, and increase the rate at which people return to work. In cardiac rehabilitation, clients are carefully monitored and under the supervision of a cardiac registered nurse and other medical professionals. There is a crash cart present in the facility for if an emergency arises. Clients Read More …

The Development of Atherosclerosis Leading to Heart Disease

Inflammation and irritation of the coronary (heart) artery inner lining can be caused by years of smoking and uncontrolled hypertension and diabetes. These inflamed areas can start to collect cholesterol from the blood stream and begin to form plaque. This plaque begins to grow and decreases the diameter of the artery which compromises blood flow. This decrease can then potentially cause angina (chest pain) symptoms. In certain situations, this plaque in the artery may rupture or break open which can lead to a formation of a clot in the coronary artery. The clot can block part of the artery preventing Read More …

7 Essential Guidelines for Exercise for Diabetics

There are several precautions a client can take to not only prevent hypoglycemia, but to also have a safe exercise experience. Use these Guidelines to help your client avoid complications during exercise. Inject insulin in a part of the body that will not actively be used for exercise. The abdomen is recommended. Check blood glucose levels before, during and after exercise the first couple of exercise sessions and/or if trying a new activity. Activity type, intensity, and duration may affect glucose levels. Typically, 1 hour of exercise = additional 15 g of carbohydrates either before or after exercise. During exercise, Read More …

6 Important Things to Know when Working with Cancer Patients and Survivors

Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Today, survival trends are improving, however the number of deaths caused by cancer has increased. More than one-third of yearly cancer deaths are related to diet and physical activity habits. Ironically, the same behaviors that contribute to decreasing the risk of cardiovascular disease such as being physically active, maintaining a healthy weight, and consuming a healthy diet can also significantly reduce the risk of developing cancer. Exercise provides a significant role in prevention and control of cancer. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that those Read More …

6 General Recommendations for Working with Clients with Respiratory Conditions

Knowledge of the respiratory system and pulmonary function is fundamental for training the client with chronic conditions known as pulmonary disorders. These disorders are characterized by airflow obstruction, cardiovascular and muscular impairments, abnormalities of gas exchange, and psychological issues including fear and embarrassment that often accompanies shortness of breath. Properly done exercise can improve musculoskeletal and psychosocial factors that limit clients with pulmonary disease. It is important to do a longer warm up and cool down for clients with asthma, COPD, and other respiratory issues. Choose an appropriate, lower demand cardiorespiratory activity for beginner or compromised clients such as cycling Read More …

3 Things to Know When Working with Diabetic Clients

Symptoms of Hypoglycemia Prevention of hypoglycemia is important for a safe exercise program for someone who has diabetes. Anyone taking insulin or an oral medication that may cause hypoglycemia should be aware of symptoms and how to manage this situation especially during exercise. Hypoglycemia occurs when glucose levels are < 70mg/dl.  This condition may become worse if not treated. Prevention is the best intervention.         Symptoms may include: sweating shaking dizziness headache confusion irritability hunger personality change weakness vision changes seizures and/or loss of consciousness. Exercise Blood Sugar Guidelines Blood glucose should be checked and treated if Read More …

Hard-to-Recognize Heart Attack Symptoms

June Chewning, BS MA In my 38 year career and 18 years owning a fitness center, I know heart attacks happen.  I have heard about them when members went home, sat up in bed, and dropped dead next to their spouse after a visit to the gym. I have made the ambulance ride to the hospital with them when they thought they just pulled a chest muscle, but their pulse and blood pressure were erratic. When they went back to work after a lunch time work out to look up the symptoms of heat attack on Google and realize it Read More …

Chronic Disease and Exercise

Chronic Disease: Unavoidable By: June Chewning MA, BS My brother once told me that “if you are born, you have a 100% chance of dying.” The other inevitable fact is that you have to die of something. Although neither of these statements is pleasant to contemplate, the reality is that at one point or another in most people’s lives, chronic disease is unavoidable. Chronic disease infiltrates the aging process, creates quality of life issues, and can in some cases be life altering. Clients with chronic disease are also unavoidable. They are prevalent in the population in large numbers, and need Read More …