Return to Life: Breast Cancer Recovery

What are some things you can do to help your client recover and thrive after Breast Cancer treatment?  What are important things to know to work with BC clients? (The information for this post is adapted from “Return to Life: Breast Cancer Recovery Using Pilates”, a continuing education course offered by Fitness Learning Systems.) As the number of breast cancer survivors continues to grow, so does the need for compassionate and knowledgeable health-fitness professionals.  Survivors need a trusted professional who can help them safely and effectively bring their life full circle through recovery to a new normal. Breast cancer affects Read More …

Functional Training for All Ages

The information in this course is from the eLearning continuing education course: Functional Training for All Ages by Sandy Stoub MS.  See the full course to learn more information about the components and importance of functional training.  Videos and interactive material are included in the course. Fundamentals of Training All persons share basic components of movement and structure regardless of age or function. These include: posture and mobility raising and lowering of the center of gravity the ability to push and pull the ability to change direction and create rotational force. Let’s consider each of these individually. Posture and Mobility Read More …

Why is Breakfast Really That Important?

Compiled by June M Chewning Brain health is directly related to blood sugar levels (glucose homeostasis) in the body. The information in this article is taken from the American Academy of Sports Dietitians and Nutritionists (AASDN) continuing education course “The Science of Nutrition.” There are so many misconceptions and misinformation about nutrition. Everyone wants to believe they are eating to properly fuel their body and prevent disease. There is one clear path to learn how to separate fact from fiction when it comes to nutrition information. For some reason, many people prefer to follow the nutrition fads, instead of trying Read More …

Your Brain on Exercise-Critical!

The information provided is adapted from “Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention and Intervention,” a Medical Fitness Specialist Certificate Program authored by Alzheimer’s Research and Prevention Foundation (ARPF) and produced by Fitness Learning Systems. June M. Chewning MA, BS, AEA Dementia is a syndrome characterized by a chronic deterioration relating to memory, thinking, behavior, and the ability to perform activities of daily living. Consciousness, however, is not affected. Dementia is not a normal part of aging. The cause may be related to a variety of diseases and injuries that may have affected the brain. The most common form of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease Read More …

Scapulohumeral Rhythm

By: Chris Gellert, PT, MMusc & Sportsphysio, MPT, CSCS, AMS The shoulder is one of the most vulnerable joints in the body due to its vast range of motion and complexity. It is a complex ball and socket joint, uniquely comprised of various connective tissue, supporting structures, including muscles. It is an important joint because functionally, it is involved in most daily and sport activities, such as reaching, lifting, carrying and throwing a ball. Knowledge of the biomechanics of the shoulder can help you with training and aiding in rehabilitation of the shoulder and related injuries. The shoulder complex involves coordinated Read More …

Alzheimer’s Disease Part 3

Exercise and Alzheimer’s Disease Adapted from the Medical Fitness Specialist Certificate Program by Alzheimer’s Research and Prevention Foundation: Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention and Intervention. (Article 3 in a 3-part series about Alzheimer’s disease.) In the first article in this series, it was noted that: although there are natural physiological changes that occur with age, memory loss is neither normal nor a natural process of aging. there is no medication at this time that cures fatal Alzheimer’s disease, so prevention is the best line of defense against the disease. exercise plays a very important role in prevention of cognitive decline and brain health. Read More …

Alzheimer’s Disease: Part 2

Prevention of Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer’s Disease Adapted from the Medical Fitness Specialist Certificate Program by Alzheimer’s Research and Prevention Foundation: Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention and Intervention. (Article 2 in a 3-part series about Alzheimer’s disease.) Through many years of research, the Alzheimer’s Research and Prevention Foundation has determined a four-part program to use in the prevention, delay, and treatment of cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease.  This program is called “The 4 Pillars of Alzheimer’s Prevention.” Recent research, some of which was sponsored by ARPF, supports the notion that lifestyle interventions can help decrease chances of developing memory loss and possibly help Read More …

Alzheimer’s Disease: Part 1

About Alzheimer’s Disease Adapted from the Medical Fitness Specialist Certificate Program by Alzheimer’s Research and Prevention Foundation: Alzheimer’s Disease Prevention and Intervention. (Article 1 in a 3-part series about Alzheimer’s disease.) Although there are natural physiological changes that occur with age, memory loss is neither normal nor a natural process of aging. It is important to take a proactive role in retaining the strength, resiliency, and vitality of the brain. Research has shown that just as the body needs strength-building exercises to maintain muscle strength, so does the brain. The brain goes through natural changes with age. However, mental decline Read More …

The Wasserman Learning Method……by June M Chewning BS, MA

The Wassermann Learning Method was developed by Dr. Jack Wasserman PhD. He started looking at learning styles and learning methods after he discovered later in life that he had Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD). This discovery shed light on many questions about how he personally approached learning and the difficulties he encountered trying to learn in a traditional education setting. He learned how to “side-step” traditional learning formats. Through understanding his own deficits, he managed to earn several degrees including a Doctorate of Science in Biomedical and Mechanical Engineering.